eMonocot Cyperaceae

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Winter Methane Emission from an Alpine Open Fen on Tibetan Plateau

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2011
Authors:Zhu, D., Chen, H. A., Wu, N., Wang, Y. F., Luo P.
Journal:Polish Journal of Ecology
Volume:59
Pagination:93-100
Keywords:alpine wetland, atmospheric methane, BOREAL PEATLANDS, dasuopu ice core, DYNAMICS, grasslands, minnesota peatlands, nitrous-oxide fluxes, photosynthates, plant growth, the qinghai-tibetan plateau, tundra, water table, wetlands, winter methane emission, zoige plateau
Abstract:

Methane (CH(4)) emission was measured from an open fen on the Zoige Plateau (3500 m a.s.l.) (the eastern edge of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau) during two winters of 2006 and 2007. Three dominant plant stands, including Carex muliensis Hand-Mazz. (CM), Eleocharis valleculosa Ohwif. setosa (Ohwi) Kitagawa.(EV) and Kobresia tibetica Maxim (KT) were chosen to be monitored. Winter CH(4) emissions were roughly estimated to be 0.94 mg CH(4) m(-2)h(-1). High spatial-temporal variations of the emission were found in this fen (the sequence of CM> EV> KT; 0.63 and 1.24 mg CH(4) m(-2)h(-1) for 2006 and 2007, respectively). Factors involved in the spatial-temporal variation were: 1) water table in summer determining the winter amount of "old" CH(4) stored in peat; 2) ice layer determining the release of CH(4); 3) plant growth determining both the quantity of CH(4) stored in peat and available substrates for CH(4) production in winter. However, due to the homogeneity of freezing in winters, predictive factors such as plant growth and water table in summer could contribute more to winter CH(4) emission than in situ freezing conditions. Considering that plant growth and water table are also the key factors controlling the spatial-temporal variation of CH(4) emission in summer, we therefore suggested that winter CH(4) emission represents the "inertia" of summer CH(4) emission.

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